The notion that we get more forgetful as we age is a cliché. Sadly, most clichés contain an element of truth. What can you do to give your memory a boost?

Physical activity – Like you’ve been hearing forever, exercise is good for you. Experts recommend dozens of small ways you can be more active, like picking a parking space farther from the store or taking the stairs instead of the elevator when it’s only a few floors.

Eating right – Foods that can help include fruits, veggies, nuts, fish and olive oil.

Spending time with friends & family – Studies show engaging in group activites can help stimulate brain activity.

Managing your blood pressure – High blood pressure can cause small blood vessels in your brin to rupture. As you might guess, that’s not good for the cells involved with memory.

What doesn’t work?

Surprisingly, researchers can find no benefit to playing “brain games,” consuming Omega-3 fish oil or ginseng.

Fortunately, they do find a brain benefit in listening to music! Yay! That means you should be listening to Boomtown America as much as possible!

We all know modern society is more disconnected than the world we grew up in. That is especially true as we age.

Isolation is different than simple lonliness. Isolation means emotional and physical disconnection with friends and family members and researchers say it affects more than 8 million Americans over the age of 50.

Prolonged isolation can contribute to poor health. A recent study suggests it's as bad as smoking 15 cigarettes!

To find oout your risk of isolation, AARP has posted a quiz online at their webite. If you'd like to take the quiz, click here.

Yes! Here's a health tip we just know you're going to want to follow!

Doctors say that eating two squares of dark chocolate (60-70% pure cocoa) can actually help prevent diabetes.

Before you break open the Hershey's, make sure you consult with your personal doctor.

When the waitress at your favorite breakfast stop asks you “bacon or sausage,” take the bacon. On average, bacon has 35 calories a slice while a die of sausage contains 277 calories. Surprisingly, bacon also contains less sodium.

If she asks, “hash browns or home fries,” take the home fries. They’re less greasy, than the hash browns and contain 15% fewer calories in comparable servings.

Yes, that organic produce may be free of pesticides and synthetic fertilizer, but it’s no safer from germs that may come from harvest, transporting and having it out on display at your grocer’s.

Experts will tell you that germs don’t really discriminate based on how the food was grown. As with any raw produce, make sure you wash it once you bring it home from the store.

If you're taking medicine for diabetes, medical experts warn that you should avoid cinnamon in large doses. Both can lower your blood sugar. Taken together, they may lower it to dangerous levels. A sprnkling of cinnamon might be okay, but avoid cinnamon in high dose supplements.

There is a right way and a wrong way to fall. As we get older, falls that result in broken bones, concussions or other injuries can be more serious.

The people who fall for a living – Hollywood’s stunt men and women, have some tips should you find yourself losing your balance:

  • Protect Your Head – If you’re falling backward, tuck your chin into your chest. If you’re falling forward, turn your face to the side.
  • Land Where the Bones Aren’t – Try to position yourself so you fall on muscle, not bone. The best place to absorb a fall is on your butt. Second best would be your back or thighs.
  • Stay Bent – Our natural instinct when we fall is to panic and stiffen up. This is the wrong move. Try to stay loose with your arms and legs bent. Do not try and stop your fall with an outstretched hand. That’s a good way to break your wrist.
  • Keep Falling – Don’t try and stop suddenly. The more you can roll and spread the stress out to a larger area of the body, the better your chances of minimizing injuries.s

The feasting season will soon be here! From Thanksgiving to New Year’s, there will be ample opportunity to become, well, more ample in the weight department!

This year, making smart choices at holiday parties and dinners may help you avoid the yearly weight loss resolutions on New Year’s Day. Here are the foods you should be looking for…

Veggies – Everyone knows that our green and yellow buddies in the vegetable kingdom can fill us up without filling us out
Shrimp Cocktail – High in protein and low in fat
Pork Tenderloin, Turkey or Ham – For the meat-lovers, nutritionists say these are your best choices for maintaining balance in your diet
Swedish Meatballs - Another protein-rich option

Of course, none of these foods gives you a license to over-eat. They just give you a fighting chance to make it through the holidays without packing on the pounds

Modern research suggest the best way to keep your brain active and sharp is to get exercise for your body!

AARP's experts recommend:

  • 150 minutes of exercise a week
  • Strength training 2 or more times a week
  • Lead an active lifestyle
  • To stay motivated consider exercising with a group

1. It’s Okay to Say “No”

We all tend to get overbooked during the holidays. Remember, you don’t have to accept every invitation you receive.

2. Take Some “Me” Time

Yes, the holidays are time for family and friends. But it doesn’t have to be 24/7! This tip goes with the first one. Make sure you reserve some alone time to decompress.

3. Watch the Holiday Treats

Most of what we eat over the holidays is carbohydrates (candy, cookies, etc.). Protein not only helps with weight maintenance, but it takes longer to digest, meaning it takes a longer time to get hungry again

4. Keep Exercising

Don’t wait for New Year’s to resolve to stay fit. Make sure you’re getting plenty of exercise before that ball drops on Dec. 31!

5. Do for Others

Not only is that the real meaning Christmas, but helping others also makes us happy!

Believe it or not, multi-vitamins and other mineral supplements are the one of the leading causes for ER visits among people our age!

But for a very different reasons than what they contain.

Nearly 40% of those visits to emergency rooms and walk-in clinics among our age group are caused by choking or swallowing problems involving vitamins and nutritional supplements!

The experts recommend taking only one pill at a time and always with plenty of liquid to help wash then down.

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