follow us!

LISTEN TO BOOMTOWN RADIO!

“ALL the Music That Matters for the Generation That Created Rock 'n' Roll”

Listen while you surf!

 

Something You Never Knew About "Some Like It Hot"

Every film fan agrees that Tony Curtis did a marvelous job imitating Cary Grant when his character was pretending to be a millionaire in the classic film comedy Some Like It Hot.

What most don't know is that Curtis had to be dubbed when he was in drag pretending to be female saxophone player Josephine. That's right. Curtis' attempts to sound like a woman sounded pretty bad. So director Billy Wilder called in veteran Hollywood voice artist Paul Frees.

If the name is not familiar, you most assuredly have heard Frees' voice. He provided the voice for literally hundreds of cartoons characters including Boris Badenov, Ludwig Von Drake, and Inspector Fenwick as well as both John Lennon and George Harrison in those Saturday morning Beatles cartoons. To this day, you can also hear Frees as your "ghost host" in the Haunted Mansion and as several of the pirates in the "Pirates of the Caribbean" attractions at the Walt Disney theme parks.

So the next time you watch Some Like It Hot, try and imagine that it's really Boris Badenov in drag!

R.I.P. Rose Marie (1923-2017)

Few performers have had as long a career as Rose Marie had. She began performing as Baby Rose Marie at the age of 3. At the age of 5, she had her own radio show on NBC.

A multi-talented singer, dancer and comedienne, she was one of the acts that opened the famous Flamingo hotel & casino in Las Vegas.

We Baby Boomers remember her best as Sally Rodgers, the man-hungry comedy writer on The Dick Van Dyke Show. Her character was actually based on Selma Diamond who had worked with Carl Reiner (the creator of The Dick Van Dyke Show) on Sid Caesar's variety shows.

While Sally never got the guy, in real life Rose Marie was married to jazz trumpeter Bobby Guy from 1946 until he passed away in 1964.

Rose Marie's career spanned 9 decades and included multiple guest star roles on TV shows as varied as The Monkees and S.W.A.T. She was also a regular on the long-running game show The Hollywood Squares.

Her life and career were recently the subject of a documentary, Wait for Your Laugh.

Gilligan to the Rescue!

There were 7 regular cast members of that deathless TV classic Gilligan’s Island; yet during the first season, the show’s catchy theme song only mentioned 5 by name. The Professor and Mary Ann were just lumped together as “the rest.”

When the show was renewed for a second season, Russell Johnson and Dawn Wells asked that their characters’ names be included in the song. At first, the network flatly refused, claiming re-recording the song would be too expensive. Then suddenly, they changed their minds and had the song revised.

What happened?

The show’s star, Bob Denver, had gone to the network and said if the song wasn’t changed, he wanted his name removed from the opening credits. The network panicked and gave in.

The rest of the cast did not find out what Denver had done until 20 years after the show went off the air!

The TV That Time Forgot: Hazel (1961-66)

Hazel was a very popular sit-com that ran for 5 seasons (4 in full color), producing 154 shows, that was also quite popular in syndication.

The show was based on a popular one panel cartoon drawn by Ted Key that ran in The Saturday Evening Post magazine. Hazel was a no-nonsense live-in maid that basically ran her household and also functioned as mother and father to her employer’s son.

In making the move to television, producers scored a real coup when they signed Academy Award-winning actress Shirley Booth for the title role. Her employers, the Baxters, were played by Don DeFore (who spent many seasons as Ozzie & Harriet’s neighbor Thorny) and Whitney Blake (who would go on to co-create the sitcom One Day at a Time). Whitney Blake was actually married to a guy named Baxter for several years before she was cast in Hazel. She’s the mother of actress Meredith Baxter. Bobby Buntrock rounded out the cast as the Baxters’ son, Harold.

Read more: The TV That Time Forgot: Hazel (1961-66)

Now Playing: "Three Coins in the Fountain" (1954)

Three Coins in the Fountain is solid proof of how easily entertained we were in the 1950’s. This piece of cinematic junk food was actually nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in the year of its release. Sadly, watching it today, one can’t help but notice that the background scenery is the most interesting part of the movie!

Made when Cinemascope was the newest gimmick studios were employing to lure people away from their newly beloved TV sets, Three Coins involves the extremely thin story of three American working girls searching for husbands in Rome, with a brief side trip to Venice.

Jean Peters, Maggie McNamara and Dorothy McGuire play the ladies in question – designed to represent young, very young and dangerously approaching middle age. They all work as secretaries – Peters and McNamara for a make-believe U.S. Government agency, “The United States Distribution Agency,” and McGuire for expatriate American author Clifton Webb (playing a far less venomous version of his character from Laura).

Read more: Now Playing: "Three Coins in the Fountain" (1954)

On My Little Margie, who did Margie's dad, Vern, work for?

The investment firm of Honeywell & Todd
O'RyanCordes Marketing