follow us!

LISTEN TO BOOMTOWN RADIO!

“ALL the Music That Matters for the Generation That Created Rock 'n' Roll”

Listen while you surf!

 

The Bewitching Elizabeth Montgomery

Even though she was the daughter of established screen actor Robert Montgomery, Elizabeth Montgomery had to work her way up the ladder of success in Hollywood the way many of her contemporary actresses did.

That meant posing for cheesecake photos while waiting for her big break. In this shot, we see the future Samantha Stevens creating magic by wiggling something other than her nose!

R. I. P. June Foray (1917-2017)

 
We lost one of the real show business greats. A woman whose voice has accompanied us all the days of our lives, June Foray has passed away. She was just 2 months shy of her 100th birthday.
 
June voiced innumerable cartoon characters from Rocky the Flying Squirrel and Natasha to Witch Hazel in the Bugs Bunny cartoons and so, so many more!
 
She also worked tirelessly behind the scenes to get cartoons and animated features the respect they deserve as vital parts of American pop culture.
 
She has left us with a rich legacy that will hopefully entertain many generations yet to come!

Summer and Soap

A Summer Place (1959)

Want to see how much times have changed? Drag this one-time blockbuster from 1959 out of mothballs and give a spin!

There’s a reason A Summer Place is best-remembered for its musical theme and not for its plot or acting. The subject matter is sex… middle-age sex and teen-age sex. And like most films from that time period, it wants to give you all the dirty details with a heaping dose of hypocritical moralizing.

Read more: Summer and Soap

Remember When: Test Patterns

Those of us of a certain age can remember when TV didn't broadcast 24 hours a day. After the Blue Angels had gone screaming across the sky as "The Star-Spangled Banner" played in the background, most stations put up what was known as a "test pattern." The stations kept broadcasting these cards until they resumed programming the next morning. They were also displayed when networks or local stations lost their transmission signal from remote locations. These were cards designed to help technicians calibrate broadcasting equipment as well as home TV sets.

When color came to dominate television, the test pattern was replaced by color bars, although even those are no longer needed to tune contemporary broadcasting equipment or flat screen TVs.

The most famous test pattern was one of the first - developed by RCA in 1939. It's known as "the Indian head" test pattern because of its inclusion of a Native American in full headdress.

For a time, NBC (owned by RCA) created an additional test pattern, featuring the network's biggest star:

Now Playing: "Paint Your Wagon" (1969)

In the late 1960’s Establishment Hollywood was near panic. All of the old rules about making and marketing movies seemed to be going out the window.

While long-time stars like Gregory Peck and Bob Hope were no longer packing ‘em in, young upstarts like Mike Nichols (The Graduate) and Warren Beatty (Bonnie and Clyde) were turning out blockbusters that their studios frankly thought should be playing the low rent drive-in circuit.

So in 1969, what did Hollywood think was a “can’t-miss” idea? Take a Broadway musical from 1951(!) and cast Clint Eastwood and Lee Marvin(!!) as the singing leads!

The result is a spectacular mess of a film, Paint Your Wagon.

Read more: Now Playing: "Paint Your Wagon" (1969)

"I'm not a doctor, but I play one on TV" was first said in a commercial for what product?

Vicks Formula 44
O'RyanCordes Marketing