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When ABBA stopped recoding in 1982 (they never officially broke up – they just stopped working together), it left many people hungry for any new ABBA material.

As the years have passed, much like the Beatles, the group has gone into the vaults and released a small smattering of previously unreleased material on “Deluxe Editions” and box sets of their classic power pop. But there is one ABBA-related item that may have flown under the radar.

When ABBA first came together in the early 1970s, they were close to being a “supergroup” of Swedish recording artists. Benny Andersson was the most famous of the quartet, having been a member of a very popular Swedish rock group known as the Hep Cats. Björn Ulvaeus had also found some success as a member of a Swedish folk group known as the Hootenanny Singers.

They're all adorable when they’re young! Like this future rock & roll troublemaker...

A good many people just assume that one of the Beatles’ best-known songs from the Sgt. Pepper era, “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” is about drugs. I mean, the initials spell out L-S-D, amirite?


Not so fast. John Lennon has always claimed the inspiration for the song’s title came from a picture his young son, Julian, drew. Julian said the picture was of his young schoolmate, Lucy O'Donnell, and that he did, in fact, tell his dad that it was a picture of Lucy in the sky with diamonds.

Among those oldies but goodies, this heartfelt plea from a fan to Frankie Avalon from 16 Magazine, September, 1960!

Frankie’s response follows below.

Would Frankie ever let his fans down?

Have your own living room rave with Sheboygan's newest hitmakers!

A Hidden Treasure From Rock & Soul’s Golden Era

A series of posts about albums you may have missed back in the day when so much good music was coming out on nearly a daily basis. But now that the real “good stuff” is few and far between, you might want to backtrack and add these gems to your music collection.

It happens so often in rock music. Artists struggle for years with albums the critics love but record buyers ignore. Then they finally break through to a wider audience and go on to long, successful careers. Yet, those earlier albums remain, for the most part, ignored.

Such is the case with Boz Scagg’s “Slow Dancer” in 1974. It was his 6th album and his 6th commercial failure. Yet, many die hard Boz fans will tell you “Slow Dancer” is his best album. We don’t think they’re wrong.

It finally happened! After more than 30 years, the members of ABBA staged an impromptu reunion on stage in Stockholm.

The occasion was a private celebration to honor ABBA’s songwriting duo, Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson, held tin 2016 at Berns Salonger to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their first meeting.

In attendance were their former spouses, the female side of ABBA, Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstadon, Before anyone knew what was happening the quartet were on stage singing “Me and I.” The effort marked their first public performance as a quartet since January of 1986.

You can find the full story here.

The band has promised a tour with holograms in the next year or so and yes, it will feature a few new songs as well as the ABBA classics.

With the release of “Days of Future Passed, the Moody Blues went from “one hit wonders” to virtually pioneering the musical form that came to be known as “progressive rock.”

The Moody Blues began life as just another band from Britain that performed covers of American r&b records. They scored one hit with “Go Now” during the first wave of the British Invasion in 1964. But like a lot of the white boys performing American black music, they found follow-up success elusive.

Between ’64 and ’67, the band reinvented itself with original members Denny Laine and Clint Warwick departing and new members Justin Hayward and John Lodge joining Ray Thomas, Mike Pinder and Graeme Edge. Their sound became more ambitious as keyboardist Pinder picked up a new instrument called a mellotron, which was capable of producing sounds very close to an orchestra’s string section.

We all love the Stones. Here are a few things you might know about them:

  1. Mick Jagger was quite the athlete. He set his grade school’s record for the half-mile.
  2. Early in their career they actually recorded the soundtrack for a Rice Krispies commercial in the UK (You can watch it here,here,)
  3. The Stones’ founder, Brian Jones was once part of a blues duo called Lewis and Ponds. Jones was calling himself Elmo Lewis. He asked his partner, Paul Pond, to become the front man of the new rock band he was forming, but Pond turned him down. That’s when Mick Jagger got the job.
  4. It was Stones’ bassist, Bill Wyman, who coined the term “groupie” back in 1965.
  5. Brian Jones played the oboe on the Beatles’ song “Baby, You’re a Rich Man,” while Mick Jagger sang some of the backup vocals. In return, John and Paul sang back-up on the Stones’ song, “We Love You.”
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