LISTEN TO BOOMTOWN RADIO! “ALL the Music That Matters for the Generation That Created Rock 'n' Roll”

There is evidence that a daily regimen of low-dose aspirin (what used to be called “baby aspirin” can reduce the risk of a first heart attack or stroke in those between the ages of 50 and 69. There is also some evidence that it may reduce the risk of colon cancer. Experts warn that such a regimen should only be undertaken by those with a high risk of heart disease and a low risk of bleeding.

As with any drug, do not begin a regimen of low-dose aspirin without consulting your doctor.

Hopefully, you’re really satisfied with your general care provider. But the experts say, if you’re starting to think he or she isn’t treating you the right way, you are probably correct and it may be time to find a new doctor.

Here are some warning signs:

  • Dismisses your concerns, saying they’re all caused by age
  • Says, “There’s nothing that can be done.” There’s always something that can be done.
  • Doesn’t let you talk, interrupts or cuts your visits short.
  • Keeps recommending treatments or specialists, but nothing’s getting better.
  • Write prescriptions with a minimum discussion with you.

Cost should never be an object when it comes to protecting you from the flu. Flu deaths among people our age is on the rise.

Here’s a quick list of places you should check for low-or-no cost flu shots:

  • Walgreen’s
  • CVS
  • Rite Aid
  • Target (stores with a CVS inside)
  • Walmart
  • Your Primary Care Doctor
  • Supermarkets (Several large chains offer them)

Yes, you can get too many of some vitamins. Pay attention to your daily intake of:

Vitamin A: More than 10,000 IUs may cause nausea, headache, dizziness or blurry vision

Vitamin B6: A daily does in excess of 100 milligrams can lead to nerve damage

Vitamin C: A recent study found that high doses of this vitamin doubles men’s risk of developing kidney stones

Vitamin D: Over 10,000 IUs a day can cause frequent urination and poor appetite as well as kidney problems

When we snack, we probably think about calories, blood sugar, etc.; but dentists tell us we should also be thinking about our teeth.

Foods made with white flour and/or sugar can feed the bacteria in our mouths and could cause problems. Nuts, healthy meats or non-sugary beverages might be a better choice.

 

 

 

New medical research indicates that light may be of significant help in treating a number of medical conditions.

Among those now be studied for the positive effects of light therapy are:

  • Depression
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Sleep Disorders
  • Skin Cancer

If you or someone you love is affected by these conditions, consult with your physician.

New research shows that you may reduce your risk of diabetes by taking 15-minute walk after meals.

This is about the time in January when it’s getting a little harder to keep that resolution. That burst of energy and willpower you had at the start of the year has started to wane as the daily routine of life lures you back into bad habits.

As we roll into cold and flu season, many of us will be guzzling those over-the-counter remedies we think we help us cope with the symptom.

There is a potential downside. Actually there are SEVERAL potential downsides.

Acetaminophen – Many over the over pills and fluids contain this common pain reliever (the main ingredient in Tylenol). It’s also found in many cold medications. If you taking both pain relief pills and cold syrup, you may quickly find yourself consuming way more than 3,000-4,000 milligram dosage recommended as the maximum safe dosage.

Too much acetaminophen can lead to nausea, stomach pain, loss of appetite and ultimately to liver damage. (We don’t have to tell you that liver damage is something we want to avoid.)

Be a Romper Room Do-Bee: You should also stay away from alcohol when taking acetaminophen. And check the ingredients of all the medications you’re taking to keep yourself under that 3,000-4,000 milligram number.

The World Health Organization has news about coffee.

First, the bad news. There is evidence to suggest that drinking any hot beverages at or above 140 degrees Fahrenheit may increase the risk of esophageal cancer.

Now, the good news, as long as it's below 140 degrees, there doesn't appear to be any cancer risk from drinking coffee.

A new study indicates that a diet rich in vitamin C can cut the risk of developing cataracts in people over 40 by 33%.

Researchers stress that the benefits does NOT come from popping vitamin C tablets, but from natural food sources, such as citrus fruit and dark green vegetables.

Bon appétit!

 

 

 

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